Don’t Just Sit There

A reminder: Get up!

In March I saw quite a few news articles about sitting increasing your risk for dying irrespective of exercise.

As a writer, an office worker, and a citizen of the laziest country on earth! :) I know that I sit too much. Well—I would sit too much if I didn’t do something about it.

But still, I probably sit too much. Get up!

This article over at NPR caught my attention because they had a nice, short video that included some good tips.

Tips to Avoid “Just Sitting There”

The first tip is to walk. If you head over to Bruce Lee’s bare bones fitness advice, you’ll see that he recommended parking farther away and taking the stairs. (Also recommended in this video.)

A tip I thought was creative was to print to a printer farther away. I like that one.

One that I didn’t like was to fidget.

I say, don’t fidget and focus on the task at hand—work. Then, get up. Fidgeting is a nasty nervous habit that makes it look like you’re unstable! The Japanese even have a word for the shaky leg thing that some people do—binbo-yusuri.

This translates literally as poverty shake.

Get More Walking

One of the ways to get more walking in is to live in a walkable neighborhood. That is a highly attractive amenity to anywhere I decide to live and was common before the age of the automobile when we foolishly stretched everything out.

Still, even if you don’t combine walking with errands, you can just simply go for a walk. Walks are extremely pleasurable and teach you to unwind. Read Why I walk for some more info.

Hey—are you still sitting down? Get up!

Which is what I’m about to do!

About Justin Qualler

Justin Qualler is that rare animal who balances an active life—he's both a full-time technical writer and devoted family man—with a level of fitness that takes a back seat to none. Justin's convinced that everyone can make optimal health and strength a default setting in their life. To prove it, he wrote the Continually Fit ebook, a comprehensive guide to achieving life-changing fitness goals in less than 2% of your waking hours.